Technology Editor at Flipboard. Journalist and marketer. Formerly with VentureBeat and The Next Web.

Progress being made but Loops and Arrays are still confusing, though I *think* I understand them conceptually.

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This is a stock image of JavaScript I found on Pexels.com. No way is this my code.

On one hand, I can be proud that I’m keeping up with my efforts to learn how to code — I’ve chosen JavaScript as my first language to get proficient in — but on the other, I think I’ve reached the Valley of Despair. Allow me to explain why though I’ve been making progress, my eyes glaze over when reading about each concept.

Codecademy has been helpful in teaching me the concepts and at first, the lessons were exciting and easily understandable. Then things got a bit more complicated with the discussion about Conditionals, Loops, Arrays and now Iterators. Conceptually…


I’ve been down this road before many times, though.

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It’s one thing to declare that I’m gunning to learn how to code. It’s another to actually execute on that goal. Oddly, I didn’t think about and I’d go about doing it. But you got to start somewhere, right?

After consulting with some friends, I opted to start learning JavaScript first. In terms of application upon completion of learning, I’m not sure. But I’m more interested in being competent in a programming language first and foremost. …


Kicking off an accountability effort as I try my hand at learning how to code.

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Google’s Stadia game controller, photographed at the company’s booth at CES 2020. (Credit: Ken Yeung)

I remember playing video games when I was younger and if there was a part where I needed to use a specific combo but I didn’t recall the controls, I would do what most people probably did then…smash all the buttons. The hope would be that by randomly pressing buttons, an action would happen magically and help me advance in my quest. Did it work? Not that often. …


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The last time I appeared on CNET’s “Daily Charge” show — during the normal times — with Roger Cheng (left) and Lauren Routt (right).

Prior to the Christmas holiday, I was honored to be invited back to CNET’s “The Daily Charge” podcast where I spoke with the publication’s executive editor, show host and my friend Roger Cheng about the 10 biggest tech stories of 2020. But there was a twist: Instead of me ranting on about what I thought were the top stories (you can read those on Flipboard’s “Tech Year in Review”, by the way), Roger and I compiled our own lists and debated it on-air.

To say the least, we had some really lively discussions about it.

What were your…


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Image credit: Walt Disney Studios

December 25 is when you’d expect to watch films with a family-friendly tone, ones in which it celebrates the holiday season and encourages us to cherish what we have. For me, some must-see movies include “A Christmas Story”, “The Polar Express”, and “It’s a Wonderful Life”. It’s the last one where I think the modern-day version has just been released.

Released exclusively on Disney+ on Christmas day, “Soul” is an extraordinary animated film from Pixar, directed by filmmaker Pete Docter, and written by Docter, Mike Jones and Kemp Powers. It stars Jamie Foxx as Joe Gardner, a jazz musician who…


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I’ve seen a few reporter friends in 2020 part ways with their companies in favor of starting their own publication. This has got me thinking about what tools would be needed in order for someone to create their own media empire. It used to be just a blog with some search marketing but then evolved to include social media. Now, there are plenty of platforms and apps in the marketplace that’ll greatly improve your reach.

As someone who has not only worked for two tech publications but spends his life observing the news practically every waking moment, I’m wondering what…


Roblox’s Director of Digital Civility explains what companies can do to make their communities safer and civil, especially when involving children.

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The internet can be a pretty awful place at times and there seem to be new stories of people being bullied or harassed online — many people have a tale where they felt unsafe when interacting with a community, be it on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, or any other social platform. Children especially are prone to this and it has unfortunately led to disastrous results for some.

I wanted to know more about what companies can do to curb bullying and harassment and make these online communities a place where people can really…


The photojournalist and tech enthusiast explains how media outlets can build rapport with readers and how to tell a better story.

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Photo credit: Anthony Quintano

As cliche as it may sound, as Tyrion Lannister once said on : “There’s nothing more powerful in the world than a good story.” And when you look at a photograph, that’s exactly what it conveys: a tale about someone’s life that gets passed down to others. For Anthony Quintano, photography is much more than a hobby — it’s a way for his audience to what’s going on in the world beyond a text-based reality. It’s all about feeling like you’re a part of the moment.

Whether it’s providing…


The founder of marketing firm AnyContext explains why ethics should be a part of every company’s product roadmap and story.

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Photo credit: Vanessa Camones

Technology was once praised for being innovative, helping to change how we do work, get around more conveniently, and communicated with one another. It helped to make the world a much smaller and more connected place — so what happened to make us question this reality?

Over the past couple of years, scandals about technology’s use in destroying our democracy, dividing us, and erosion of our privacy have stemmed its progress. Today, we’re examining whether companies like Facebook and Google have amassed too much influence and should be broken up, if technology…


Tenor’s chief executive explains why we’re fond of GIFs, how he wants to capitalize on it, and ways visual communication has changed.

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Tenor CEO David McIntosh (Photo credit: Google)

What is it about animated GIFs, those image files that oftentimes make it easier to convey what we’re trying to say versus typing it out? They’re everywhere, from being plastered across social networks to our emails and messaging apps like iMessage and WhatsApp. A big part of the proliferation of GIFs is thanks to a company called Tenor, formerly Riffsy. It has helped make embedding GIFs naturally into our conversations. But it’s much more than a form of expression, which Tenor’s chief executive David McIntosh has shared with me in the past.

While some might think that the insert of…

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